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Ida Lupino, a legendary actress of Hollywood's Golden era who became not only an important but one of the very few women stars of that time who went on to become a recognized film director started life in Camberwell London, England, Feb. 4, 1914. She was the daughter of theatre couple Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lupino. Her uncle was the popular Lupino Lane. At 19 she too entered films (she had played on small role in a 1931 British film) and appeared in 6 films in 1933. Her mother brought her to Hollywood in 1934 and her career was launched. This collection is a rare representation of that first year in Hollywood and is a very rare glimpse into the making of a star, under the old star contract system of the classic era of Hollywood. Seldom does a collection of this archival and historic quality come up for public sale. It is likely that this is the only near complete set of Lupino's first year of publicity photography at her home studio, Paramount and is not represented in any public or private archives.

Within the collection are portraits, her day to day life, events she attended, her star build up, fashion publicity and publicity for her very first films.

Ida learned her craft of film making during this initial year. Her progression in learning that is well documented as you move through these photos, dated from late 1933 to Spring 1935.

Lupino would go on to become a star actress at Warner Brothers after her initial 5 years as starlet/leading lady. She would become known for her tough characters with a heart of gold. She would become most well known as a brunette, letting go of her platinum dyed tresses--- so in vogue in 1934.

She is well revered as the only major woman star of the 1930's and 40's to become a well established film director of the 1950's (while continuing to act), and inspired many women film makers to this day.

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